After a healthy smattering of posts I seem to have run out of things to talk about… Or I’ve been working diligently on gift projects I can’t yet discuss. ‘Tis the season.

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Today I’d like to share an interesting website I just stumbled on via Pinterest. It’s called Unsung Patterns: An Archaeology of Home Sewing. The image above is from this post on, of all things, corset bags. It appears to date from the 1910s or so and features an embroidery design bag. The bag itself is made from a strip of fabric 9″ x 1 1/2 yards long, folded in half and stitched on the long sides.

I must say, though I store corsets and have seen modern commercial versions of bags (usually one side is clear plastic), it never occurred to me to make one. My corsets tend to live folded into large handkerchiefs. Silly me.

Other entries on the blog feature some other unique items, including early 19-teens aprons, 1930s pirate costumes (not as bad as you might expect), a 1920s Martha Washington costume, some German patterns and a variety of early century work wear, all with a little history and background included.

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I’m rather interested in aprons right now, so this post on a 1926 “Bungalow Apron” from the New Jersey based Aladdin Apron Company (great name!), with its musings on the possibilities of women going beyond the home sewing realm into cottage industry is particularly appealing.

It’s an interesting site to peruse. Enjoy!

Rogues of Thread will be attending the Halcyon Craft Fair this weekend, selling holiday aprons.

I’ll also be taking orders for custom aprons. There are lots of fabrics to choose from and they can be made up in most of the designs seen on this blog. Come check us out!

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We’re working on a custom Victorian costume for Halloween. What you’re looking at above is the fitting for the jacket. You can also see the bottom of the apron-type overskirt and the skirt. What you’re not seeing is the final shape of the jacket, which will be a tailcoat.

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The apron overskirt has some pleats in the sides and basically a really wide tie in the back.

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Here’s a bit of a bonus. I really didn’t know how the back of the corset was going to work, particularly with the tie on the overskirt acting like a bit of a bustle. Here’s what is going to happen. It’s going to divide the tails.

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Red stripped fabric, little snowmen, Christmas trees, holy and other festive greenery. This apron has two pockets, a played flounce and a generous bow.

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This apron is based on one my mother in law has that belonged to her mother. [Edit: I believe it was from the 1940s]. It’s not put together the way we would do it these days. The side seams are stitched with the wrong sides together and the seams bound on the outside with 1/4″ bias tape for decoration. The rest of the raw edges are given the same bias binding treatment.

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I altered an existing pattern and didn’t like the way it had the pockets over the seams. If I avoided the seams and moved the pockets to the outside they wouldn’t be very useful so I stacked them in the center instead.

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I think I’ll make this one again. =)

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Christmas apron with integral tie. The tie is one piece that goes behind your neck, feeds through channels on the inside then secure around your waist. Four pockets in front.