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No felt on the back of this one. Haven’t decided if I like it on the hat with the existing bow or not.

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Here’s a smaller one with loops that are one and a half times the ribbon width.

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I found the felt, so this one has a slightly smaller round of felt on the back that I can use to anchor the loops.

Here’s another cockade, this one is probably a more typical specimen.

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It’s made with 1″ grosgrain ribbon and loops that are 2″. I’ve used a little over 52″. It turned out about 4 1/2″.  The loops are stitched onto a round piece of cotton batting. It’s pretty ugly, so you don’t get too see that part. Ideally I would have attached it to a similar or complementary color piece of felt, but I couldn’t find any around.

As I do more research into various periods of historic costume I find myself having a more and more difficult time properly trimming various garments. Sure there are places that sell historic trims, but how often are those going to match what I’m making? Many historic trims were made from the same fabric (or contrast fabric) as the garment they went on.

My search into historic trims led me to fabric manipulation and to ribbon trims for hats. Many of the techniques are related.

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I just got a reprint of an old book on hat trims and this is my first attempt. It’s a ribbon cockade that goes on a hat or is for a dress decoration in the 30s/40s. I made it with a thinner that usual grosgrain ribbon I had on hand that is about 3/4″ wide. I’d say I used about a yard. The technique involved folding the ribbon into a continuous strip of triangles and tracking the selvedge, not unlike making ribbon roses as a kid. A final trim would have a button in the center and maybe another layer of trim under this one.

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For the last few years my intention for gift giving has been to make as much as possible myself or buy from artsy friends or people at craft shows and online marketplaces like Etsy. With the exception of books (of course), electronics, music and other similar things. The idea is to give more thoughtfully and more specifically.

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The downsides to making and buying handmade are that I have to come up with ideas for items people will really like – I have to know them pretty well in some cases. I also have to plan way ahead. If I come up with an idea too late I might not have time to pull it off or it may be too dissimilar to the other things I’m making, increasing the time all around.

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This year I spent to much time on a doomed gift (a huge crochet project that I probably won’t finish until June now), made two dopp kits and five aprons, and bought one pair of electric toothbrushes. In typical fashion I undertook a new pattern, graded another up a size, created several custom graphics that were overly complex for the application, and used a technique I only had vague experience with. I completed my last task, setting the graphics on two of the aprons, Christmas morning. I also forgot to buy wrapping paper (which I like the look of, but always feel so wasteful for using…) and had to wrap gifts in crumpled brown paper and tissue paper I had on hand.

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Things turned out pretty well, though I made the mistake of buying twill for the aprons. It was a mistake only because the vinyl stencils didn’t stick perfectly to the slightly textured weave and images were not 100% crisp. I didn’t do the graphics on the Hawaiian fabric aprons (which I also didn’t take pics of apparently), but they weren’t lacking. I did turn the white flowers slightly pink pre washing the fabric, which is still bothering me, obviously. (Must remember to try those Tide color catcher sheets). I didn’t finish the inside of my husband’s dopp kit or get to wax it, but it looked good and came home with me anyway.

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All in all the gifts were received well. Would I want to repeat the Food Seasons in New Orleans graphics in exactly the same way? Maaaaybe. I need to work on my process in getting complicated stencils from the sticky cutting mat to the project surface. I’ve used stencil transfer paper, but I find it to sticky. Next time I may try some clear vinyl over my stencil instead.

Now that Christmas projects are over Happy new year!

I went to my company Christmas party this evening. While I was waiting for my husband to get home I ended up with some time on my hands and started playing with my hair.

I present to you the 7 Braid Pseudo French Twist.

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Here’s what I did:

1. Sectioned off the front third of my hair and pinned it up in a clip temporarily.
2. Pulled the bottom third back in a pony tail, also temporarily.
3. Braided two lose braids from the remaining hair on the sides, one on each side.
4. Remove the bottom pony tail and braided two lose braids, one over the other.
5. Removed the top clip and sectioned out that hair to the left, right and center and braided each section.

When I was done braiding I basically had 7 braids, two over each ear and three stacked from top to bottom.

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Notice that I have different colors bands on each braid. Some that are the color of my hair would have been much better.

Next I grabbed the whole thing and started to twist it like I would a bun, but I let the ends stick down out of the right side. That left a loop on top. It’s not quite a French twist, but close. I stuck my double hairstick in, then used the pins to stuff in the ends and add that little swirl on the right (totally unintentionally) and to hide a couple of the bands that were showing. If I had hair colored bands I would have only used 4 pins and the hair stick.

The only thing I would have done differently was to think through the front before braiding. I could have pinned it so my hair was parted or had a little volume, which would have looked a little nicer. All in all it was a fun updo that I would do again.