Misc. Roguery


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No felt on the back of this one. Haven’t decided if I like it on the hat with the existing bow or not.

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Here’s a smaller one with loops that are one and a half times the ribbon width.

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I found the felt, so this one has a slightly smaller round of felt on the back that I can use to anchor the loops.

I went to my company Christmas party this evening. While I was waiting for my husband to get home I ended up with some time on my hands and started playing with my hair.

I present to you the 7 Braid Pseudo French Twist.

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Here’s what I did:

1. Sectioned off the front third of my hair and pinned it up in a clip temporarily.
2. Pulled the bottom third back in a pony tail, also temporarily.
3. Braided two lose braids from the remaining hair on the sides, one on each side.
4. Remove the bottom pony tail and braided two lose braids, one over the other.
5. Removed the top clip and sectioned out that hair to the left, right and center and braided each section.

When I was done braiding I basically had 7 braids, two over each ear and three stacked from top to bottom.

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Notice that I have different colors bands on each braid. Some that are the color of my hair would have been much better.

Next I grabbed the whole thing and started to twist it like I would a bun, but I let the ends stick down out of the right side. That left a loop on top. It’s not quite a French twist, but close. I stuck my double hairstick in, then used the pins to stuff in the ends and add that little swirl on the right (totally unintentionally) and to hide a couple of the bands that were showing. If I had hair colored bands I would have only used 4 pins and the hair stick.

The only thing I would have done differently was to think through the front before braiding. I could have pinned it so my hair was parted or had a little volume, which would have looked a little nicer. All in all it was a fun updo that I would do again.

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These patterns are the 1911 corset from Bridges on the Body and the Laughing Moon #113 from 1900-09.

First, the caveats: 1. this is an unfair comparison – sort of. The two patterns are clearly very different garments, but both are under bust corsets of sorts, 2. The two patterns aren’t quite the same size. The bottom (1911) is larger by almost two inches at the waist and hips, and 3. The bottom pattern does not currently include a seam allowance at the front or back. 4. I have the back piece of the LM to far too the left. The grommet holes are in the solid fabric of the 1911.

I’ve made the LM several times and like it overall. Being a waist cincher and having only one set of curves, I consider it a good basis on which to judge other similar garments as I did with an Elizabethan corset here.

Focusing on the back pattern, the 1911 which is new to me, what am I noticing in the two patterns?
1. The 1911 is quite short in front top and rather tall in back. Since I personally find the LM to be short, this is going to be a problem.
2. The 1911 is really long at the bottom. Something like 19″ overall length at this size (a 42 waist / 44 hips, which translates to about 30″ waist / 40″ hips). You aren’t seeing the suggested boning placement. I’d say they are similar in length to a typical Victorian corset. This leaves quite a bit of material as a form-fitting skirting piece, which should make for smooth lines. I’d say this will go all the way past my bum. The unboned skirt will be about half the total length.
3. I don’t know where they are measuring the hips exactly. Logically it should be where the pattern looks largest, but logic doesn’t always prevail. The fact that I had to make my usual one size jog between waist and good tells me it’s probably going to work for me.
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4. The individual piece shapes look logical to me and match those of the LM reasonably well. There are two pieces in the back, a sort of side-front and two fronts. The skinny piece next to the front on the LM (which you can see lapped by the third in the image above) never made much sense to me, but might if it were a full corset.
5. There is a busk in the front, but it looks like the back could either go solid and non-opening (which i don’t think they did) or have traditional lacing.

Of course I have and to complicate things and I won’t be content to make the garment as is. My plan is to use this as the basis for a 1930s corset. I will be making it up in coutil with power mesh inserts.

Next step – a mock up.

Well obviously, given the recent quick photo posts.

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The blue and red one above is my own design, based on images of 20s / 30s aprons, with some neck line trim to tie it together.

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The neck is adjustable with a couple buttons to lengthen or shorten it. There are two pockets, which are lined in the same blue as the trim and flounce.

More aprons to come!

Christmas 2014 saw me doing exactly zero sewing. That’s not to say I didn’t work with fabric. I stretched my crocheting knowledge and stenciled designs on a pre-made napkin and pint glasses. Here are a few pics:

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Chevron Crochet Scarf. Double Crochet.

More after the jump. (more…)

Even though I don’t like New Year’s resolutions, I end up thinking about them. Last year I had some blogging opportunities that I didn’t take advantage of. I realized it was because it wasn’t always terribly convenient to post. To that end, I am attempting to post-by-email and this is my first such post. I have no idea what it will look like, what tags will appear or what category it will fall in. I’ve also set up an IFTTT (ifttt.com) recipe to keep a log of my posts in Evernote (evernote.com) for later reflection. Clever, no? (Flaw #1, I’m writing this in EN web and can’t add links this way).

And, lest you think I haven’t made anything in the last many months since my last post:

Monster feet slippers!

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